Washington among least expensive workers’ comp states

Workers’ compensation, as described by Cornell University, is made of “laws [that] protect people who are injured on the job. They are designed to ensure that employees who are injured or disabled on the job are provided with fixed monetary awards, eliminating the need for litigation.” Workers’ comp is how we protect employees. It is a vital part of our state’s framework and helps injured people seek justice. But some people are attacking it, according to The Stand.

According to the latest state-by-state comparison on national business competitive assessments, Washington is among the least expensive states for actual employer costs paid for workers’ compensation.

Chief Actuary for the Washington State Department of Labor and Industries (L&I), only ten state have less expensive coverage to employers:

Strangely, (or perhaps not so strangely) the Washington Roundtable, which represents big business CEOs in the state, tried to declare that “Washington is the most expensive state in the nation for workers’ compensation benefits paid per covered worker.” This was partially in response to L&I’s proposal to increase the average workers’ comp rate by 1.8 percent to keep up with wages and to help rebuild the system’s reserves.

As it would turn out, the Roundtable wasn’t referring to what employers pay, but to the benefits provided to injured workers. That is, they aren’t complaining about the cost, but our high level of care for injured and disabled workers.

They point to reports from the Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services and the National Academy for Social Insurance, picking out certain statistics, ignoring the rest, and not noticing that these studies fail to take into account several factors. Oregon’s study, for example, misses additional costs such as the Stay at Work program and Supplemental Pension Fund, retrospective refunds, and that Washington is the only state in the nation where workers pay a portion of the cost.

Big businesses are trying to misuse this data to encourage policy makers and legislators to cut benefits to workers. This is simply another case of putting profits over people.

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